The Wobblies — another way forward for low-wage workers?

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With next to no planning and little experience with labor law or direct action, all four workers on the late-night shift at the Insomnia Cookies store in Cambridge, Mass., walked off the job on August 18, declaring themselves on strike. Fed up with inadequate wages, long shifts without a break and no benefits, they timed the strike to begin with Insomnia’s midnight rush, causing maximum financial damage to the firm. Read more at Waging Nonviolence .

Labor Militancy Inspires Generations: the Bread and Roses Strike

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Labor Day typically passes without much note, serving as a symbolic holiday conceived of to keep American workers from aligning their struggle with workers across the world, who celebrate International Worker’s Day on May 1st. On Labor Day this year, however, workers in one Massachusetts industrial city had reason to be elated. In Lawrence, MA, they celebrated, with great pride, the centennial of the famous two-month long Bread and Roses mill strike. In this economically-depressed More

Fracking site bows to Earth First! convergence

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Following their annual week-long Round River Rendezvous, occurring this year in Pennsylvania’s Allegheny National Forest, Earth First! activists from across the United States successfully shut down a hydraulic fracturing site in the nearby Moshannon State Forest. Read more at Waging Nonviolence

Taking Occupy Wall Street from May Day to every day

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The fallout from May Day can be felt in every sector of Occupy Wall Street. Some people say it was one of the greatest days since the movement began and are excited for what comes next. Others left with a sour taste in their mouths, whether by the lack of aggressive actions, or by the police state erected in Lower Manhattan, or by simply being worn down from overwork. Read more at Waging Nonviolence

Anarchy and solidarity on May Day

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“So are we in solidarity with each other, or are we united?” This question came up yet again on Monday night, at the final coalition meeting for May Day that included people from organized labor, immigrants’ groups and Occupy Wall Street. Read more at Waging Nonviolence